Museum in the News

Museum in the News

Media Coverage

‘Play Ball’: See the Message That Launched American Soldiers Into World War II

When the message was decoded, it was only two words long, and it could have referred to almost anything: PLAY BALL. In the context, however, the meaning was clear — and more complex than its brevity would suggest. The recipient, after all, was Maj. Gen. George Patton, who was on a ship off the coast of Casablanca, waiting for word from Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, the future president and Suprememe Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force.
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Commemorating a Battle and Bogie

There will be many retrospectives marking the 75th anniversary of “Casablanca,” the November 1942 motion picture of World War II intrigue starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman. But non will integrate the actual battle of Casablanca, Nov. 8-16, 1942, quite like “The Real and Reel Casablanca,” a new exhibit opening Nov. 8 and running through Feb. 3, 2018 at The International Museum of World War II.
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Here’s looking at you, Casablanca

A movie poster for “Casablanca,” which premiered 75 years ago this month. “Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world, she walked into mine.” That town was Casablanca, and not only was it the scene of the most oft-quoted movie in Hollywood history, it was America’s point of entry into the war against Hitler.
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4 questions about ‘Dunkirk’

The movie “Dunkirk,” which opens on Friday, chronicles the epic 1940 evacuation from the French coast of more than 330,000 British and other Allied troops as German forces closed in on all sides. Metro Minute asked Kenneth Rendell, founder and director of the International Museum of World War II in Natick, to reflect on the significance of the operation, known as Operation Dynamo.
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At Natick museum, World War II feels all too real

With 10,000 artifacts and half a million documents, it plans to expand

It is not the Sherman tank, nor the mannequin of Hitler dressed in his actual brownshirt uniform, not the chess board that concentration camp inmates made from rye bread that pops up over and over again in student feedback forms about their visit to The International Museum of World War II in Natick.
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Remember Pearl Harbor: Exhibition Commemorates 75th Anniversary of Attack

Massachusetts museum gives multiple perspectives on the “date which will live in infamy”

On the morning of 7 December, 1941 — “a date which will live in infamy,” as President Franklin D. Roosevelt described it — a surprise Japanese military attack on Pearl Harbor, a U.S. Naval base in Oahu, Hawaii, killed 2,403 Americans and jolted the United States into entering an international war on two fronts.
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Making Pearl Harbor Personal

An exhibition at the Museum of World War II commemorates the 75th anniversary attack and humanizes a larger-than-life historic event.

The Museum of World War II, a hidden gem in this leafy suburb outside Boston, has a new temporary exhibit through Jan. 7, 2017, commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.
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A Thing of the Past –  or Is It?

The 1000-Reichsmark bills on display at the New York Historical Society’s “Anti-Semitism 1919-1939” exhibition seem almost unused, fresh from the 1922 German mint, probably because rampant inflation quickly made them worthless.
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The Museum of World War II acquires book signed by Anne Frank

The Museum of World War II, located in Natick, has acquired a copy of “Grimm’s Fairy Tales” signed and inscribed “Anne Frank en Margot Frank.” (Margot was Anne Frank’s sister.) The book, and an accompanying letter signed by Otto Frank, the girls’ father, had been valued at between $20,000 and $30,000 by Swann Auction Galleries.
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With World War II Museum, a Collector Wants to Get People to Think

Amid the World War II artifacts stands a Sherman tank, dominating the room. Though battle-scarred –  sharp divots of metal punched out on every side –  this formidable vehicle appears ready in an instant to throw its armor back into combat.
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No ‘Imitation’: Natick Museum Holds Collection of WWII Enigma Machines

At Sunday’s 87th Academy Awards, one of the nominees for Best Picture is “The Imitation Game,” which tells the story of Alan Turing, the British mathematician who, during World War II, managed to break the code of the German military encryption device, the Enigma machine.
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Like Smoldering Sparks, War’s Ephemera

A World War II Exhibition at the Grolier Club

As autographed pictures go, there may be none so damning as the one that David Lloyd George, Britain’s prime minister during the latter part of World War I, inscribed on Dec. 1, 1933: “To Chancellor Hitler, with admiration for his brilliant gift of courage.”
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