What Teachers and Students Tell Us

What Teachers and Students Tell Us

What Teachers and Students Tell Us

We welcome students from all kinds of academic programs and communities — public, independent, charter, pilot, religiously-affiliated, and home school. Some of the schools whose teachers and students we have worked with:

  • Billerica
  • Boston College Campus Academy
  • Boston Public
    • Boston Latin Academy Middle School
    • Henderson Inclusion School
    • Josiah Quincy Upper School
    • Lyndon Pilot Middle School
    • Umana Academy Middle School
  • Bow (New Hampshire)
  • Braintree
  • Brookline Middle School
  • Burlington
  • Cambridge
  • Catholic Memorial
  • Concord-Carlisle
  • Dudley-Charlton Regional
  • Epic OutSchooling
  • Framingham
  • Framingham State University
  • Governors Academy
  • Harvard-Bromfield
  • Hingham
  • Hull
  • Keefe Technical
  • Leominster
  • Lincoln-Sudbury
  • Littleton
  • Lowell Elementary School
  • Lynn
  • Marblehead Community Charter Public
  • MassBay Community College
  • Matignon High School
  • Medfield
  • Mt. Ida College
  • Natick Middle School
  • Natick High School
  • Newton
  • North Reading
  • Northampton
  • Nobles & Greenough
  • Randolph Middle School
  • Rashi School Middle School
  • Rivers School
  • Roxbury Latin Academy
  • Shrewsbury
  • Somerville
  • Stoneham, SEEM Collaborative Campus Academy
  • Stoughton
  • TEC Phoenix Academy
  • Tremont School
  • Touchstone Community Middle School
  • Walpole
  • Wayland
  • Wellesley College
  • Wellesley High School
  • Westborough
  • Weston
  • Willow Hill School
  • Wilmington
  • Winchester
  • Xaverian HS

From teachers we hear

  • “I frequently organize field trips for my students, and I can say that without a doubt, this was the most engaging and important one my students have ever attended. World War II is a monumental event in human history- and as much as I could try, there is nothing that I could do to make it “come alive” like the experience of them being at the Museum.”
  • “The experience of being at the Museum is transformative for our Boston Public Schools students…This museum is the perfect introduction to scholarly study of WWII for them because it is interactive, encourages students to touch and engage with artifacts, and utilizes well-trained volunteer docents who can answer student questions as they arise. Additionally, the museum’s education staff does the pre-work necessary to ensure that the visit is successful — they find out information about the students themselves, plan a learning activity in collaboration with the teacher bringing students, and clear expectations are communicated to students ahead of the trip.… The museum’s efforts to preserve and celebrate the diversity of American forces in WWII are not lost on them. Our students see their own faces in the images of African-American soldiers, women serving as WAVES and WACs, and Navajo code breakers. Many of our students are immigrants from around the world, and the global context of the war presented at the museum allows them to see the impact of WWII in and around their nations of origin. For example, many of our students who have emigrated from China were fascinated to learn from artifacts related to the Japanese invasion and occupation of China during WWII.”
  • “More than any other experience they’ve had in school, the Museum gave our students a sense of ‘historical empathy.’ They were able to experience and understand what others went through, and gain a sense of compassion for people who experienced World War II. And, I think that translates into how they can express empathy towards others today.”
  • “History is typically presented in a pre-packaged way for students to consume. At the museum the students must process the artifacts for themselves. What I enjoyed most about our visit was moving around the museum and hearing the students talk to each other about what they were seeing. Their conversations were rich with prior knowledge, inferences and questions. History education is often overlooked in favor of preparing for standardized testing. For these reasons, it is especially important that we partner with institutions that share our passion for history and our belief in the importance of preparing students to be citizens. The museum does that by reminding our young learners what other young people sacrificed, and what selfless courage they are capable of. The museum respects the intelligence and maturity of visitors in a way that is rare for our students to encounter. They are used to being told where to stand, not to touch things and that there is only one right answer. The museum respects the students by encouraging them to interact with the collection, and this subtle shift means a lot to a kid who is used to being told what not to do.”

From students we hear

  • “Seeing the artifacts up close changed me. The Museum put our world in perspective.”
  • “The Museum made the war seem a lot more real.”
  • “The Museum helped me think of all the people in the war as individuals, not just a mass of soldiers.”
  • “The Museum showed me what the war was like from all perspectives. There were many aspects to World War II we don’t always learn at school.”
  • “I was really struck by the clothing worn by the prisoners, to know real blood, sweat and tears were absorbed into the same cloth I saw before me.”
  • “I know now that there were so many things going on at once, and what total war must have felt like.”
  • “The Nuremberg Trial documents gave me a sense of moral justice and I felt empowered.”